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Iguanas

Iguanas

Green iguana or common iguana is a large, arboreal herbivorous species of lizard of the genus Iguana native to Central and South America. Commonly found in captivity as a pet due to its calm disposition and bright colors.



         

Iguanas




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Green iguanas (Iguana Iguana) can reach up to 6 1/2 feet and weigh up to 11 pounds. Their diet consists of leaves, flowers and fruit and they are excellent swimmers with no fear of the water, often using it to escape their predators. Native to Central and South America, and the Caribbean, they are often kept as pets although they if not cared for properly, they do not thrive in captivity. Iguanas are typically quite active during the day, but often don’t leave the trees they inhabit unless it is to mate, lay eggs, or change trees.

Snakes

Snakes

Snakes are reptiles and all reptiles evolved from amphibians. The very first reptiles appear in the geological records some 300 million years ago, when a group of amphibians developed the shelled egg.

Snakes

         

Snakes




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The Bahamian boa constrictor (Epicrates striatus) is a native species to The Bahamas, found on almost all major Bahamian islands. As tree-dwellers, these snakes are non-venemous and enjoy a diet of frogs, birds and rats, and, if allowed to live a full life, will consume thousands of rats and mice in their lifetime. Bahamian folklore has it that the Bahamian boa is a threat to humans, and as a result, many are needlessly killed every year. The species is threatened and at risk of endangerment for this reason, as well as habitat destruction and collection as pets. We have three Bahamian boas on display at Ardastra: Jackie, Chunk and Slim. They are all between six and seven feet in length.

 

Tortoises

Tortoises

Yellow-footed tortoise (Chelonoidis denticulata, formerly Geochelone denticulata) is a species of tortoise in the family Testudinidae. It is found primarily in South America.



         

Tortoises




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The yellow-footed tortoise (Chelonoidis denticulate) is most commonly found in the Amazon area of South America living in grasslands, savannas and forest areas. Its diet consists of many different types of plant and vegetable matter, as well any small creatures like worms or snails that they can catch, given their slow speed. The tortoises identify each other through body language, the males swinging their heads back and forth to each other. They are able to single out females easily, as the females do not motion with their heads. Females may lay six to 16 eggs a year, but they offer no parenting of their young, leaving them to fend for themselves from birth on. This tortoise is considered an endangered species, most often being captured for its meat.

 

Curly and Moe, two of the tortoises at Ardastra, were donated as adults in 1982. Chucky was donated in 2001. Green Iguana Green iguanas (Iguana Iguana) can reach up to 6 1/2 feet and weigh up to 11 pounds. Their diet consists of leaves, flowers and fruit and they are excellent swimmers with no fear of the water, often using it to escape their predators. Native to Central and South America, and the Caribbean, they are often kept as pets although they if not cared for properly, they do not thrive in captivity. Iguanas are typically quite active during the day, but often don’t leave the trees they inhabit unless it is to mate, lay eggs, or change trees.

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